Interesting reading on the website about the ash trees in Vermont and the loss of these trees through the invasion of the ash borer. I have included photos of two different ash trees on my property. The larger tree shows signs of dying in that many of the upper limbs do not leaf out anymore and look dead. You can see it in the photo. That tree is about 33″ or 34″ in diameter at 2 feet above ground. Much heavy ground work was done nearby and around it when that section of our property was cleared and the groundscape changed considerably. Perhaps that work has something to do with the tree’s decline. I haven’t seen evidence of the ash borer.

The other photo is of a young ash further up the yard. It is about 8″ in diameter. Looks quite healthy for now. I love the shape of both these trees and also like the compound leaves.

—Carl Roof, Woodstock

A tall, mature tree with some dead branches: Carl Roof shared these photos as part of VLT's My Ash Story project.

Carl says this older tree shows signs of dying — many of the upper limbs do not leaf out anymore. It’s about 33 or 34″ in diameter (2 feet above ground).

A young, thriving ash tree: Carl Roof shared these photos as part of VLT's My Ash Story project.

Carl says this is “a young ash further up the yard. It is about 8″ in diameter. Looks quite healthy for now.”

 


About Ash Stories: Ash Stories is a collaboration between the Vermont Land Trust and the Vermont Urban & Community Forestry Program to celebrate Vermont’s ash trees and their role in our woods, wetlands, and towns. You can learn more about the project here

Do you have an ash story to share? We’d love to hear from you. Email ash@vlt.org with your story to be included in our collection. Questions? Contact Allaire Diamond, VLT ecologist.

 

Topic: AshAsh stories