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Farm For Sale!

Landon Farm

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Vermont Land Trust is selling the Landon Farm in South Hero as part of its Farmland Access Program.  Read more.

Stories about our Farmland Access Program

Eric RozendaalFarmland Access Program Works to Preserve Agricultural Heritage

Conservation isn't just about keeping land undeveloped; it's about helping talented, entrepreneurial farmers gain access to productive land, preserving Vermont's heritage as a rural and agricultural state. Read more.

 

Rico and JillCouple Start New Fruit Busines in Wells

Rico and Jill Balzano had worked with VLT's Farmland Access Program to acquire the 105-acre farm portion of the Delaney Farm to create Little Lake Orchard, a mixed fruit venture that will emphasize pick-your-own opportunities for the community. Read more.

 

leduc_corie60A Family Ensures their Farm Remains a Farm

VLT used its Farmland Access Program to find new farmers who would purchase the Leducs' land. Bread and Butter Farm feeds the community that invested in it. Read more.

 

hands holding beansGrowing Food and the Next Generation of Farmers

Spencer and Jennifer Blackwell used the Farmland Access Program to move from the Intervale to their own farm in Middlebury. Read more.

Farmland Access: Connecting Farmers with Affordable Farmland

Spencer and Jennifer BlackwellThe goal of our Farmland Access Program is to provide farmers with opportunities to purchase or lease affordable farmland so that they can start up or expand agricultural businesses. Supporting local communities, local food production, and the long-term productive use of farmland are all objectives of this program.

 

Why did we create this program?

Gaining access to high quality, affordable farmland is one of the most difficult obstacles for beginning farmers and expanding agricultural operations. The challenge is especially acute for enterprises that depend on being near Vermont’s economic growth centers—areas where land values remain strong even in the current economic climate.

As more farms are put up for sale as a result of an aging farmer population, the question of whether the land will be farmed or will remain available for local food production is a growing concern. In response to this concern, we developed our Farmland Access Program in 2004.

 

How do we accomplish this work?

We approach the issue of farmland access from many directions, using creative approaches adapted to each situation. Below are several examples of how we have accomplished this work so far.

Purchasing farms and re-selling them
When a good opportunity arises, we will purchase a farm, request interested farmers submit proposals for their use of the farm, and later, obtain funding and conserve the farm, and finally sell the farm at an affordable price to the farmer whose proposal was chosen.

Connecting people with farms as they come on the market
We maintain a list of people looking for farm ownership or lease opportunities. We contact those on the farm-seeker list as soon as we hear about affordable farms for sale. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you are interested in signing up.

Purchasing conservation easements to make farms affordable
We use the sale of conservation easements to help defray the costs of purchasing a farm. We will seek funding for the easements from the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, foundations, and community members.

Exercising rights reserved in our conservation easements to ensure land continues to be owned by farmers
Provisions written into many of our farm conservation easements include the right of first refusal or the right to purchase a farm if a potential buyer is a non-farmer. We have exercised these rights when we thought a farm might be sold to someone who wouldn’t use the land for farming. When this has happened we have re-sold the farm at agricultural value to farmers with solid business plans.

Expanding farm-leasing opportunities
We are beginning to expand our work with leasing opportunities on both land we own and on previously conserved farmland owned by private landowners.

Providing technical assistance
In conjunction with some of the approaches outlined above, we will help farm seekers secure business planning services through the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board Farm Viability Program, and assist in securing appraisal work necessary for land purchases. We also work with farm lenders to evaluate opportunities, help facilitate farmland transactions, and assist farm seekers through the process of purchasing a farm.

 

Who is qualified to participate in this program?

Minimum qualifications require candidates to have three years of farming experience, strong agricultural references, plans to develop an agricultural enterprise that would gross $100,000 per year within 5 years of start up, and sufficient financial resources (or the ability to be financed) for start-up expenses. Our primary focus is on farms producing food and fiber that would use at least 25 acres of productive land.

 

Who we work with

Our program staff works with organizations throughout Vermont to provide assistance to farm seekers and farmers in transition in an effort to secure access to affordable farmland. These organizations include the University of Vermont, local and regional food hubs, the Northeast Organic Farming Association, the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, and the Vermont Agency of Agriculture.


Contact Us

To learn more about the Farmland Access Program, contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , Farmland Access Program Director, at (802) 533-7705. If you have farming experience, you can be added to our farm seeker list.

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